Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Of the many industrial processes that contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, none produces as much methane and nitrous oxide as agriculture. Around half of all methane and three-quarters of all nitrous oxide emissions originate from agricultural activity,1 with livestock farms being the most significant contributors. Since approximately 81% ofContinue reading Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

The story of Henrietta Lacks and her cells that changed science

By Lisa Ding Since their establishment in 1953, the HeLa cell line has become the most commonly used human cell line in the world. Over 110,000 publications involved the use of these cells, which can divide indefinitely in culture, making them valuable for scientific research.1 The HeLa cell line, the oldest cell line, are derivedContinue reading The story of Henrietta Lacks and her cells that changed science

Are COVID jabs the best way to protect children?

By Jasper Kan Since it’s first recorded outbreak in China, SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has wreaked havoc among humanity, bringing numerous casualties and the world to a standstill. While many (including governments) believe indiscriminate vaccination is the only way out, others doubt the unknown effects that a novel vaccine exerts. This doubt is particularly concerning for theContinue reading “Are COVID jabs the best way to protect children?”

The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

By George Young Few things carry the satisfaction of a historical mystery being put to rest by modern science. For well over three hundred years, the Salem Witch Trials have accumulated morbid fascination that extends far beyond the reaches of the Massachusetts city in which they took place.1 While the witchfinders were undeniably cruel sadistsContinue reading The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

siRNAs: the future of cholesterol management?

By Allis Lai On September 1, 2021, NICE approved inclisiran, a new siRNA drug for patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia or mixed dyslipidaemia.1 This is a big step forward for RNA therapeutics, a field that has been rapidly gaining traction in the past two decades. Small interfering RNA, known in short as siRNA, is a shortContinue reading siRNAs: the future of cholesterol management?

Females: Genetic Mosaics

By Alice Barocco Have you ever wondered what makes mosaics such a breath-taking piece of art? Perhaps, for some people, the answer lies in their beautiful colours ranging from vibrant shades to more subtle hues, whilst for others it may be the random scattering of small irregular pieces of cobblestone coming together to form aContinue reading Females: Genetic Mosaics

Gene therapy advancements to treat Sickle Cell Disease

By Easha Vigneswaran Since the advent of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for gene editing, the medical world has been met with a new way of targeting many chronic genetic diseases. One of these includes sickle cell disease, a genetic blood disorder that results in defective haemoglobin. Whilst treatments exist to minimise the effects of the disease onContinue reading “Gene therapy advancements to treat Sickle Cell Disease”

Targeting pericytes to normalise the tumour vasculature 

By Themis Halka  In recent years, the role of vasculature in tumours has drawn great interest. Vasculature has key roles in growth and survival, through transport of nutrients and oxygen. In the past, strategies to prevent tumour growth have focused on preventing development of vasculature– but a new focus of research now aims to restoreContinue reading Targeting pericytes to normalise the tumour vasculature 

Cytoplasmic streaming in plants

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Though seemingly docile on the outside, plants, like all other multicellular organisms, are in constant dynamic turmoil on the inside. Under the microscope, you might notice that live plant cells are never quite motionless in place; their outer membrane fluctuates and vibrates, organelles swim around in the cytoplasm, and the veryContinue reading Cytoplasmic streaming in plants

Digital Twins

By Naveesha Karunanayaka The idea of a digital twin holds different meanings across many sectors. Within Healthcare, creating a ‘digital twin’ involved curating a genetic profile of an individual which can then be used for medical purposes. This digital ‘self’ of an individual can then be used for drug and therapy testing – with suchContinue reading “Digital Twins”