A review of erythropoietin and its use in doping

By Anaya Sirothia Upon hearing the term ‘doping’ in sports, many recall the drug scandal involving Lance Armstrong in 2012, or perhaps the disqualification of Festina from 1998’s Tour de France.1 As the news coverage focused primarily on the athletes themselves and the implications of the doping on their respective sports, the science behind theseContinue reading “A review of erythropoietin and its use in doping”

An introduction into NK cell cancer immunotherapy – Pharmaceuticals

By Easha Vigneswaran Cancer, one of the most difficult diseases to treat, is at the forefront of the pharmaceutical world for the development of treatments. From drugs to monoclonal antibodies, all forms of therapy are being tested with many having vast amounts of success. However, inevitably, there are also many cancers that are becoming increasinglyContinue reading An introduction into NK cell cancer immunotherapy – Pharmaceuticals”

Will smoking really reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease? 

By Themis Halka  Alzheimer’s disease is a preoccupying neurodegenerative disease, and the leading cause of dementia. Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease can only relieve symptoms and slow down neuronal death – there is no cure available to restore the loss of neural tissue. Therefore, acting on the risk factors and finding new neuroprotective agents that couldContinue reading Will smoking really reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease? 

Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

By Nishka Mahajan The technique of bacteriophage or phage therapy, involving the usage of viruses as a remedy for bacterial infections, has existed for about a century now. It was developed based on how phages work: they recognise, bind to, and replicate within bacterial host cells, finally causing cell lysis. However, phage therapy remained aContinue reading Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

Flowers or flores: The neuroscience underpinning bilingualism

By Laima Susta It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him. German and Spanish are accessible to foreigners: English is not accessible even to Englishmen.1 The above musings on the complexity of language originate from “Pygmalion”, Bernard Shaw’s play in which he explores theContinue reading Flowers or flores: The neuroscience underpinning bilingualism

Zt3LysM: a key effector protein in the fungal plant pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

By Fiona Zhang Introduction The love-hate ‘tug of war’ between plants and fungi has long been one of nature’s most fascinating enigmas. On the one hand, the mutualistic mycorrhizal symbiosis allowed embryophytes to colonise the terrestrial biosphere ca. 500 Mya by expanding the nutrient uptake repertoire of plants;1 on the other hand, pathogenic fungi accountContinue reading Zt3LysM: a key effector protein in the fungal plant pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

Cellular agriculture: meat without slaughter

By Clarie Lo Around 12000 years ago, the human civilisation stopped foraging for food, and troops of hunter-gatherers settled as farmers. The raising, slaughtering and downstream processing of livestock has never stopped in order to meet the ever-rising demand for meat. As the food industry blossoms, the availability of arable land begins to shrink, andContinue reading Cellular agriculture: meat without slaughter

The unfaithful companion of plants – mycorrhizae

By Runtian Wu Mycorrhizae are fungi that share a close relationship with the plant’s roots. Such a relationship often involves a direct exchange of resources such as carbon and phosphorus that can impact the growth of plants. Although hidden on earth and invisible to most non-specialists, mycorrhiza has an important role in the ecosystem. TheyContinue reading The unfaithful companion of plants – mycorrhizae

Scar free wound healing – a new reality?

By Madeleine Eaton Scars – we all have them. But while some may think of scars as a memory of a past incident, they have a high clinical burden. It is estimated that 100 million patients a year develop surgical scars (and that isn’t counting the millions more who get small scars from everyday incidents).1Continue reading Scar free wound healing – a new reality?

An introduction to HIV treatments

By Allis Lai Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the globe. The retrovirus attacks the immune system, leading to loss of functional T cells and causing an increased risk of infections, bone disease, kidney and liver dysfunction, and other complications. The virus is transmitted viaContinue reading An introduction to HIV treatments