Eating disorders: who is really at risk?

By Adriana Ramos Calvo     Eating disorders (EDs) are a type of deadly and surprisingly common psychiatric disorders. The most common variants are bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and binge-eating disorders, but many more, however, are also diagnosed on a daily basis all around the world (Lutter, 2017). According to the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA),Continue reading “Eating disorders: who is really at risk?”

Stem cell therapy for leukemia

By Jenny Tang    Stem cells have the ability to dedifferentiate into different types of cells in the body and can be used to replace damaged cells. This theory had led to the creation of stem cell therapies which can, in theory, be used to treat patients who have suffered, for example, spinal cord injuries, orContinue reading “Stem cell therapy for leukemia”

Skinny Legend: The Truth Behind Weight Loss Supplements

By Sophya Yeoh In an age of convenience where almost anything can be procured almost immediately, it is no wonder why many try to apply this approach to weight loss. This is further fuelled by the societal pressure to have an “ideal” body shape that is plastered all over social media, while most live aContinue reading “Skinny Legend: The Truth Behind Weight Loss Supplements”

Xenobots: Tiny blobs with massive potential

By Heiloi Yip When asked to envision the future of biotechnology, one might think of a couple common images. Some may think about synthetic organisms using tissue pieced together from different species to form a ‘Frankenstein’s monster’. Others may think about a swarm of tiny robots that work together like ants might do, performing aContinue reading “Xenobots: Tiny blobs with massive potential”

Sleep Deprivation on a Genetic Level

By Ng Chi Wai, Jessie We all know night owls – people who would stay up until 3 a.m. to cram in all their coursework, or perhaps for no reason at all. Some of us are night owls by choice, some are not. Around 15-20% of workers in Europe and the USA are required toContinue reading “Sleep Deprivation on a Genetic Level”

Fungi: the forgotten kingdom in conservation

By Cara Burke When you picture conservation, you probably picture teams of people working with large animals, collecting plants or restoring ecosystems. Fungi are very often kept out of the conservation picture. However, they definitely deserve a place there, and their importance in conservation is increasingly being recognised. Fungi are incredibly important to ecosystems andContinue reading “Fungi: the forgotten kingdom in conservation”

Demystifying Polar Gigantism: The Oxygen-Temperature Hypothesis

By Wang Jia Hua Gigantism is a natural phenomenon which has long fascinated biologists, but its underlying mechanisms remain contentious and elusive. Examples of gigantism include insular gigantism and abyssal gigantism, in which certain island dwelling or deep-sea dwelling species are considerably greater in size than their mainland or shallow-water counterparts, respectively. Indeed, gigantism isContinue reading “Demystifying Polar Gigantism: The Oxygen-Temperature Hypothesis”

A Poorer Purpose: The Influence of Vested Interests

By Ethan Sim Impartiality is a cornerstone of scientific inquiry (Lacey, 1997), and undergirds science’s ability to accurately inform human understanding and policy (Oliver & Boaz, 2019). Scientific impartiality is often juxtaposed against vested interests – secondary goals which diverge from the primary aim of elucidating truth (Babor, Miller & Edwards, 2010). When these interestsContinue reading “A Poorer Purpose: The Influence of Vested Interests”

Wait but most of our ancestors are left-handed?

By Haoyu Li For many years, scientists have always believed that right-handedness is more likely to be a phenomenon unique to humans (Balter, 2009). Humans’ preference for the right hand began millions of years ago: In a study published on Evolutionary Anthropology, Lozano et al (2017) analyzed the fossil of Homo habilis and found thatContinue reading “Wait but most of our ancestors are left-handed?”

Eating disorders: who is really at risk?

By Adriana Ramos Calvo Eating disorders (EDs) are a type of deadly and surprisingly common psychiatric disorders. The most common variants are bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and binge-eating disorders, but many more, however, are also diagnosed on a daily basis all around the world (Lutter, 2017). According to the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA), eatingContinue reading “Eating disorders: who is really at risk?”