A review of erythropoietin and its use in doping

By Anaya Sirothia Upon hearing the term ‘doping’ in sports, many recall the drug scandal involving Lance Armstrong in 2012, or perhaps the disqualification of Festina from 1998’s Tour de France.1 As the news coverage focused primarily on the athletes themselves and the implications of the doping on their respective sports, the science behind theseContinue reading “A review of erythropoietin and its use in doping”

An introduction into NK cell cancer immunotherapy – Pharmaceuticals

By Easha Vigneswaran Cancer, one of the most difficult diseases to treat, is at the forefront of the pharmaceutical world for the development of treatments. From drugs to monoclonal antibodies, all forms of therapy are being tested with many having vast amounts of success. However, inevitably, there are also many cancers that are becoming increasinglyContinue reading An introduction into NK cell cancer immunotherapy – Pharmaceuticals”

Will smoking really reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease? 

By Themis Halka  Alzheimer’s disease is a preoccupying neurodegenerative disease, and the leading cause of dementia. Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease can only relieve symptoms and slow down neuronal death – there is no cure available to restore the loss of neural tissue. Therefore, acting on the risk factors and finding new neuroprotective agents that couldContinue reading Will smoking really reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease? 

Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

By Nishka Mahajan The technique of bacteriophage or phage therapy, involving the usage of viruses as a remedy for bacterial infections, has existed for about a century now. It was developed based on how phages work: they recognise, bind to, and replicate within bacterial host cells, finally causing cell lysis. However, phage therapy remained aContinue reading Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

An introduction to HIV treatments

By Allis Lai Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the globe. The retrovirus attacks the immune system, leading to loss of functional T cells and causing an increased risk of infections, bone disease, kidney and liver dysfunction, and other complications. The virus is transmitted viaContinue reading An introduction to HIV treatments

Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Of the many industrial processes that contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, none produces as much methane and nitrous oxide as agriculture. Around half of all methane and three-quarters of all nitrous oxide emissions originate from agricultural activity,1 with livestock farms being the most significant contributors. Since approximately 81% ofContinue reading Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

The story of Henrietta Lacks and her cells that changed science

By Lisa Ding Since their establishment in 1953, the HeLa cell line has become the most commonly used human cell line in the world. Over 110,000 publications involved the use of these cells, which can divide indefinitely in culture, making them valuable for scientific research.1 The HeLa cell line, the oldest cell line, are derivedContinue reading The story of Henrietta Lacks and her cells that changed science

The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

By George Young Few things carry the satisfaction of a historical mystery being put to rest by modern science. For well over three hundred years, the Salem Witch Trials have accumulated morbid fascination that extends far beyond the reaches of the Massachusetts city in which they took place.1 While the witchfinders were undeniably cruel sadistsContinue reading The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

siRNAs: the future of cholesterol management?

By Allis Lai On September 1, 2021, NICE approved inclisiran, a new siRNA drug for patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia or mixed dyslipidaemia.1 This is a big step forward for RNA therapeutics, a field that has been rapidly gaining traction in the past two decades. Small interfering RNA, known in short as siRNA, is a shortContinue reading siRNAs: the future of cholesterol management?

Gene therapy advancements to treat Sickle Cell Disease

By Easha Vigneswaran Since the advent of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for gene editing, the medical world has been met with a new way of targeting many chronic genetic diseases. One of these includes sickle cell disease, a genetic blood disorder that results in defective haemoglobin. Whilst treatments exist to minimise the effects of the disease onContinue reading “Gene therapy advancements to treat Sickle Cell Disease”