Cytoplasmic streaming in plants

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Though seemingly docile on the outside, plants, like all other multicellular organisms, are in constant dynamic turmoil on the inside. Under the microscope, you might notice that live plant cells are never quite motionless in place; their outer membrane fluctuates and vibrates, organelles swim around in the cytoplasm, and the veryContinue reading Cytoplasmic streaming in plants

Digital Twins

By Naveesha Karunanayaka The idea of a digital twin holds different meanings across many sectors. Within Healthcare, creating a ‘digital twin’ involved curating a genetic profile of an individual which can then be used for medical purposes. This digital ‘self’ of an individual can then be used for drug and therapy testing – with suchContinue reading “Digital Twins”

Reverse engineering: turning Jurassic Park into reality

By Clarie Lo In 1990, the science fiction novel Jurassic Park was published. People were fascinated by the idea of constructing a theme park with dinosaurs freely roaming on the island. As a writer with a background in anthropology, Michael Crichton’s attempt in describing how these extinct creatures were cloned from DNA found in mosquitoesContinue reading Reverse engineering: turning Jurassic Park into reality

Influence of bacteria on the quality of drinking water

By Yuchen Lin Water is an important source of life, and high-quality drinking water is critical for the health of human beings. Poor quality sources of water or poorly treated transport systems for water may result in high potential of microorganisms accumulating on the surfaces of water pipes. Such collections of bacteria patches on theContinue reading “Influence of bacteria on the quality of drinking water”

Impact of food on health

By Runtian Wu Introduction As the ageing of populations occurs in many nations worldwide, people are increasingly looking for health-oriented diets to avoid diseases and increase the life span.1 Various health claims are circulating in the daily communications, such as the benefit of vegetarian, tea, restricted food intake, and organic food. Although many of theseContinue reading Impact of food on health

AMPK: Its implication in polycystic kidney disease and cystogenesis

By Daniella Gimbosh Scientists have been elucidating the role of thousands of enzymes, genes and molecules present in the body since the dawn of time. One of these substances is an enzyme called AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is an enzyme that plays a vital role in metabolism regulation and has been referred to asContinue reading AMPK: Its implication in polycystic kidney disease and cystogenesis

The microbial colonisation of the human body

By Andrea Flores Esparza Planet Earth is probably the wrong place to be if you do not like microorganisms as they are everywhere. In everything that surrounds you, on you and even inside of you. The fact that we are living in a bacterial world—rather than a ‘Material World’ as suggested by Madonna—has been knownContinue reading The microbial colonisation of the human body

Repurposing an old tuberculosis vaccine against diabetes

By Madeline Eaton Type 1 diabetes is a serious autoimmune condition in which patient’s own immune system destroys insulin production beta cells in their pancreas, meaning the patient is unable to control blood sugar levels, over time leading to nerve and blood vessel damage vision problems, and more.1 In the UK, 400,000 people are diagnosedContinue reading Repurposing an old tuberculosis vaccine against diabetes

The enzymology of DHFR and its role in pathogen and tumour prophylaxis

By Andres Hernandez Maduro It is rare for coincidental discoveries to lead to viable prophylactic treatments. This was most probably the case when, in the 1920s, Lucy Wills found that an undiscovered nutrient in yeast extract could be used to treat patients with macrocytic anaemia.1 Soon thereafter, Wills’ results were both corroborated and expanded uponContinue reading The enzymology of DHFR and its role in pathogen and tumour prophylaxis

Will centenarians soon be the norm? 

By Themis Halka  Over the past few decades, life expectancy has drastically increased worldwide – reaching an average of 71 years old in 20191. This mortality shift has emerged from an overall improvement in living conditions: increased income, nutrition, education, and medical access.2 In a 2002 paper, life expectancies in Sweden and Japan were describedContinue reading Will centenarians soon be the norm?