Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Of the many industrial processes that contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, none produces as much methane and nitrous oxide as agriculture. Around half of all methane and three-quarters of all nitrous oxide emissions originate from agricultural activity,1 with livestock farms being the most significant contributors. Since approximately 81% ofContinue reading Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

The interdisciplinary issue of mangrove conservation: ecology, economics, and ethics

By Evangeline Wilby Mangroves are one of the most biologically diverse and ecologically productive ecosystems on earth. They are found in salt water coastal regions and provide a range of critical ecoservices that must be protected. Mangrove systems are very important carbon sinks, since they have the ability to sequester vast amounts of carbon, evenContinue reading The interdisciplinary issue of mangrove conservation: ecology, economics, and ethics

From rainforest to reef: how loss of apex predators is deconstructing the earth’s biomes

By Evangeline Wilby ‘Flagship’ species are species that are used to gain public attention for conservation efforts because they are likeable organisms that act as ambassadors for their ecosystem.1 These flagship species are often large, notable species that are apex predators and therefore losing them is a much greater issue than loosing ecosystem aesthetic. LosingContinue reading From rainforest to reef: how loss of apex predators is deconstructing the earth’s biomes

Tree Planting and Carbon Sequestration: oversimplifying the problem?

By Clemence Blanchard Now more than ever – with COP26 fresh in our minds – we are aware of the climate change threat. Whole ecosystems and biodiversity are especially at risk, partially exacerbating the issue since certain organisms like plants act as carbon sinks. As a result, many organisations and governmental initiatives devote their energyContinue reading “Tree Planting and Carbon Sequestration: oversimplifying the problem?”

Management strategies for conserving the White Rhino

By Evangeline Wilby The white rhino, Ceratotherium simun, is currently listed as near threated by the IUCN and has a decreasing population size.1 This species in important to conserve because it is a ‘flagship species’ for conservation, meaning it is used as an ambassador to draw global attention to protecting biodiversity. Additionally, it is a vegetation grazer, meaning it is critical to shaping the landscape andContinue reading Management strategies for conserving the White Rhino

The Importance of Including Indigenous Local Communities in Conservation Efforts

By Evangeline Wilby Conserving biodiversity, protecting species from extinction, and restoring habitats to allow ecosystems to thrive are amongst the key aims of conservation research and ecological scientists. However, saving as much as we can, as quickly as we can may not be the most effective long-term solution. Conservation needs a holistic approach, with interdisciplinaryContinue reading The Importance of Including Indigenous Local Communities in Conservation Efforts

The potential for marine eco-engineering

By Rachel Chan Coastal regions are densely populated, with much of recent human population growth occurring within these areas (Martínez et al., 2007). As a result, the phenomenon of “ocean sprawl” is becoming increasingly prevalent. Ocean sprawl refers to the replacement of natural marine environments with artificial structures (Firth et al., 2016). With growing coastalContinue reading The potential for marine eco-engineering

Coral Bleaching

By Katherine Bethell Marine invertebrates called coral are essential for maintaining the health of the world’s oceans; they provide a habitat for a diverse range of plant and animal species whilst protecting coastal areas by absorbing wave power. However, the so-called bleaching of coral threatens its survival and function globally.  Bleaching is characterised by theContinue reading “Coral Bleaching”

On food diets, carbon footprints and health: a complex issue

By Clemence Blanchard Whether or not we are aware – or care – about it, food contributes substantially to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In spite of this, food remains at the center of our lives, health and culture-wise – and will continue to do so in the future. This issue is currently exacerbated by our growingContinue reading “On food diets, carbon footprints and health: a complex issue”

How stable carbon isotope analysis can help to protect marine species

By Evangeline Wilby Stable carbon isotope analysis (CIA) is a chemical approach used to uncover the past of marine organisms, which promises to be invaluable for predicting and protecting their future (Haywood et al., 2019). The Natural History Museum has used this approach to determine the movements of a 4.5 tonne blue whale, nicknamed ‘Hope’,Continue reading “How stable carbon isotope analysis can help to protect marine species”