Keystone species: how marine mammals can tell us about ocean health

By Asia Lie The ocean can tell us a lot about the health of our environment, namely in terms of global warming. The world relies on the ocean for a large amount of industry and products. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the ocean contributes to the economy at a conservative estimateContinue reading “Keystone species: how marine mammals can tell us about ocean health”

The effects of overfishing and climate change on marine life

By Naveesha Karunanayaka  As the global population grows and the demand for food becomes ever higher, the strain on marine ecosystems increases. ‘Catching fish is not inherently bad for the ocean, except for when vessels catch fish faster than stocks can replenish, something called overfishing,’ remarks the WWF on the matter.1 While some fishing is done inContinue reading “The effects of overfishing and climate change on marine life”

Managing an evolving relationship between trawling and marine life 

By Alice de Bernardy  Overfishing and ocean pollution are only a portion of the results of today’s fishing activity. Although fishing can be a great and sustainable source of food and income under appropriate scales, the reality remains that a quarter of global fishing comes from trawling activity,  in which immense nets are dragged throughContinue reading “Managing an evolving relationship between trawling and marine life “

Biological control – how nature is our friend and our foe

By Simran Patel Pests threaten lives and livelihoods when they damage crops1. While it’s easy for people to directly blame pests, outbreaks are the result of poor ecological decisions by humans. We grow monocultures in which every crop is susceptible to the same pest, and pests can hitchhike ships and planes to invade places theyContinue reading Biological control – how nature is our friend and our foe

Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Of the many industrial processes that contribute to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, none produces as much methane and nitrous oxide as agriculture. Around half of all methane and three-quarters of all nitrous oxide emissions originate from agricultural activity,1 with livestock farms being the most significant contributors. Since approximately 81% ofContinue reading Tackling climate change through ruminal methanogenesis

The interdisciplinary issue of mangrove conservation: ecology, economics, and ethics

By Evangeline Wilby Mangroves are one of the most biologically diverse and ecologically productive ecosystems on earth. They are found in salt water coastal regions and provide a range of critical ecoservices that must be protected. Mangrove systems are very important carbon sinks, since they have the ability to sequester vast amounts of carbon, evenContinue reading The interdisciplinary issue of mangrove conservation: ecology, economics, and ethics

From rainforest to reef: how loss of apex predators is deconstructing the earth’s biomes

By Evangeline Wilby ‘Flagship’ species are species that are used to gain public attention for conservation efforts because they are likeable organisms that act as ambassadors for their ecosystem.1 These flagship species are often large, notable species that are apex predators and therefore losing them is a much greater issue than loosing ecosystem aesthetic. LosingContinue reading From rainforest to reef: how loss of apex predators is deconstructing the earth’s biomes

Tree Planting and Carbon Sequestration: oversimplifying the problem?

By Clemence Blanchard Now more than ever – with COP26 fresh in our minds – we are aware of the climate change threat. Whole ecosystems and biodiversity are especially at risk, partially exacerbating the issue since certain organisms like plants act as carbon sinks. As a result, many organisations and governmental initiatives devote their energyContinue reading “Tree Planting and Carbon Sequestration: oversimplifying the problem?”

Management strategies for conserving the White Rhino

By Evangeline Wilby The white rhino, Ceratotherium simun, is currently listed as near threated by the IUCN and has a decreasing population size.1 This species in important to conserve because it is a ‘flagship species’ for conservation, meaning it is used as an ambassador to draw global attention to protecting biodiversity. Additionally, it is a vegetation grazer, meaning it is critical to shaping the landscape andContinue reading Management strategies for conserving the White Rhino

The Importance of Including Indigenous Local Communities in Conservation Efforts

By Evangeline Wilby Conserving biodiversity, protecting species from extinction, and restoring habitats to allow ecosystems to thrive are amongst the key aims of conservation research and ecological scientists. However, saving as much as we can, as quickly as we can may not be the most effective long-term solution. Conservation needs a holistic approach, with interdisciplinaryContinue reading The Importance of Including Indigenous Local Communities in Conservation Efforts