Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

By Nishka Mahajan The technique of bacteriophage or phage therapy, involving the usage of viruses as a remedy for bacterial infections, has existed for about a century now. It was developed based on how phages work: they recognise, bind to, and replicate within bacterial host cells, finally causing cell lysis. However, phage therapy remained aContinue reading Bacteriophage therapy: potential solution for antibiotic resistance?

The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

By George Young Few things carry the satisfaction of a historical mystery being put to rest by modern science. For well over three hundred years, the Salem Witch Trials have accumulated morbid fascination that extends far beyond the reaches of the Massachusetts city in which they took place.1 While the witchfinders were undeniably cruel sadistsContinue reading The Salem Witch Trials: the Devil’s Work or a Fungal Infection? 

Targeting pericytes to normalise the tumour vasculature 

By Themis Halka  In recent years, the role of vasculature in tumours has drawn great interest. Vasculature has key roles in growth and survival, through transport of nutrients and oxygen. In the past, strategies to prevent tumour growth have focused on preventing development of vasculature– but a new focus of research now aims to restoreContinue reading Targeting pericytes to normalise the tumour vasculature 

Influence of bacteria on the quality of drinking water

By Yuchen Lin Water is an important source of life, and high-quality drinking water is critical for the health of human beings. Poor quality sources of water or poorly treated transport systems for water may result in high potential of microorganisms accumulating on the surfaces of water pipes. Such collections of bacteria patches on theContinue reading “Influence of bacteria on the quality of drinking water”

The microbial colonisation of the human body

By Andrea Flores Esparza Planet Earth is probably the wrong place to be if you do not like microorganisms as they are everywhere. In everything that surrounds you, on you and even inside of you. The fact that we are living in a bacterial world—rather than a ‘Material World’ as suggested by Madonna—has been knownContinue reading The microbial colonisation of the human body

Repurposing an old tuberculosis vaccine against diabetes

By Madeline Eaton Type 1 diabetes is a serious autoimmune condition in which patient’s own immune system destroys insulin production beta cells in their pancreas, meaning the patient is unable to control blood sugar levels, over time leading to nerve and blood vessel damage vision problems, and more.1 In the UK, 400,000 people are diagnosedContinue reading Repurposing an old tuberculosis vaccine against diabetes

Epstein-Virus and Multiple Sclerosis

By Easha Vigneswaran  Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease that causes the demyelination of nerves and neurons due to the immune system mistakenly attacking the central nervous system. At present, it is not exactly clear what the direct cause of the disease is, but for 35 years, scientists have hypothesised that previous infectionContinue reading “Epstein-Virus and Multiple Sclerosis”

Alteration of the gut microbiome by anti-diabetic drugs 

By Shiyi Liang Diabetes is a disease that affects millions of people around the world. In the UK, there are more than 3.5 million diagnosed diabetic patients. The capital expenditure on antidiabetic drugs in the UK have increased to a figure of up to £686 million in recent years.1 Type 2 diabetes comprises 90% ofContinue reading Alteration of the gut microbiome by anti-diabetic drugs 

Flagellar locomotion: assembly, rotation and variation

By Andres Hernandez Maduro With the ever-fluctuating conditions of our world, it is crucial for biological organisms to be able to adapt and respond to external changes in their environment. This is especially true for bacteria, which face a constant struggle to procure limited resources and compete with the many other microscopic species around them.Continue reading Flagellar locomotion: assembly, rotation and variation

Harvesting the microbiota: Faecal Microbiota Transplant

By Kai Yee Eng Our gut is colonized by a group of microorganisms, forming a diverse ecosystem unseen by the naked eye. This colony includes archaea, bacteria, and virus, and they interact with the host in the gut environment, playing a huge role in managing the health of the host.1,2 These tiny organisms bring great impact by involving in key activities suchContinue reading Harvesting the microbiota: Faecal Microbiota Transplant