Human cell atlas: mapping the building blocks of life

By Ellie Fung In 2003, the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP) marked a major milestone in biological research. The collaborative efforts of research groups worldwide, later boosted by the development of next-generation sequencing technologies, culminated in the first fully sequenced human reference genome.¹ Since then, the HGP has transformed research in human biologyContinue reading Human cell atlas: mapping the building blocks of life

Using honey DNA to detect counterfeits

By Heiloi Yip Honey needs no introduction as a versatile food product that you or I may use in our everyday lives, from being dissolved in tea or lightly drizzled on some pancakes. Not only is honey a nutrient- and energy-rich substance, but it also has antibacterial properties and various health benefits. For example, honeyContinue reading “Using honey DNA to detect counterfeits”

Lamin proteins and their roles in nuclear structural support, cell morphology and ageing

By Andres Hernandez Maduro Intracellular metabolic proteins are fundamental to the viability of life, and none are arguably more important than those involved in DNA regulation and maintenance. Nuclear lamin proteins, required for structural support of the nucleus and DNA repair, are just as significant. Nuclear lamins are a subset of intermediate filament proteins thatContinue reading Lamin proteins and their roles in nuclear structural support, cell morphology and ageing

The role of circular RNA in cancer formation and progression

By Victoria Zhang Within the non-coding RNA family, circular RNAs(circRNAs) is a novel endogenous class that forms a covalently closed ring structure without 3’ and 5’ ends. Due to their lack of free ends, circRNAs have high stability and resistance to RNase degradation.1 This high stability enables them to be evolutionarily conserved and present widelyContinue reading “The role of circular RNA in cancer formation and progression”

The protein memory: how keratins control embryonic cell fate

By Andres Hernandez Maduro The process of cell specialisation is intricate and dynamic, varying across cell types. Pathways for stem cell differentiation are dependent on both their surrounding extracellular matrix and mitotic parent. However, the exact process of controlling cell fate is less certain – so how does a fertilised egg know to become aContinue reading The protein memory: how keratins control embryonic cell fate

Targeting complement pathways in Immunoglobulin: a nephropathy therapeutic treatment 

By Clarice Tse Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), also known as Berger’s disease, is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and a vital cause of renal failure, especially in southeast asian countries. Characterised by the deposition of galactose-deficient Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) on the kidney glomerulus, IgAN was found to be in association with a life expectancy reductionContinue reading Targeting complement pathways in Immunoglobulin: a nephropathy therapeutic treatment 

Gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease: a way forward?

By Elisa Botting Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with no current cure. The disease results in the loss of neurons responsible for the release of dopamine (termed dopaminergic neurons) in the substantia nigra – a region of the brain’s basal ganglia which is important for movement¹ . Its progressive nature means that symptoms likeContinue reading Gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease: a way forward?

The “Immortality Enzyme”: Human Telomerase Holoenzyme as a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target

By Alice Barocco Human Telomerase Holoenzyme, most known as Telomerase and often regarded as the “Immortality enzyme”, is a cellular reverse transcriptase comprised of protein subunits and RNA.1 The enzyme can be pictured as a molecular motor: its role is to add new stretches of DNA, more specifically a “TTAGGG” sequence, onto the ends ofContinue reading The “Immortality Enzyme”: Human Telomerase Holoenzyme as a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target

Manipulating the Genetic Alphabet – Molecular Biology

By Easha Vigneswaran Biology is governed by one of the key laws that illustrate the idea that the genetic code consists of four nucleotide bases where adenine bonds with thymine and guanine with cytosine. For years, synthetic biologists have theorised and tested the possibility of increasing the number of DNA bases. In the last fewContinue reading Manipulating the Genetic Alphabet – Molecular Biology

Coronin-1B and Its Role in Cell Migration Within Glioblastoma Multiforme Metastasis

By Daniella Gimbosh Cancer is a destructive disease that has been devastating humankind since time immemorial. Cancer exists in a myriad of different forms within almost any tissue type, thus proving to be even more difficult to research. Importantly, cancer cells have specific properties that allow them to spread, or metastasize, to secondary locations. TheContinue reading “Coronin-1B and Its Role in Cell Migration Within Glioblastoma Multiforme Metastasis”