Why are some cancers so difficult to treat?

By Madeleine Eaton Cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell division, leading to the formation of a tumour within the body. This is caused by both environmental and genetic factors and develops over time, eventually invading secondary tissues in the body in a process called metastasis.1 Cancer deaths account for a quarter of deaths inContinue reading Why are some cancers so difficult to treat?

Xist. A potential gene therapy against Down syndrome?

By Themis Halka  When talking about diseases arising from chromosomal abnormalities, Down syndrome is one which springs to mind. Caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21, it is the leading genetic cause of intellectual disabilities worldwide, as well as a comorbidity for multiple health issues, including hematopoietic disorders or early-onset Alzheimer’s.1 Chromosomes are the supportContinue reading “Xist. A potential gene therapy against Down syndrome?”

DNA Hard drives- a new way to store and read data, what are they and what could they be used for?

By Jenny Tang    DNA Hard drives (DNA-HD) are based off DNA nanotechnology and nano pores which are achieved by reading molecules, one by one per millisecond using nanopores. This is done by annealing 7228 nucleotides stranded DNA, creating a scaffold. Taking advantage of the negative charge of DNA, it can be read by nanoporeContinue reading DNA Hard drives- a new way to store and read data, what are they and what could they be used for?

The gut bacteriome and virome in Covid-19 patients

By Madeleine Pramoedya The bacteriome itself presents a subset of the microbiome which exclusively consists of bacteria. It is the most widely studied and characterised aspect of the gut microbiome.1 It has also long been suggested that the composition of the gut microbiome influences host physiology and plays a strong role in modulating the host’sContinue reading “The gut bacteriome and virome in Covid-19 patients”

The “Immortality Enzyme”: Human Telomerase Holoenzyme as a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target

By Alice Barocco Human Telomerase Holoenzyme, most known as Telomerase and often regarded as the “Immortality enzyme”, is a cellular reverse transcriptase comprised of protein subunits and RNA.1 The enzyme can be pictured as a molecular motor: its role is to add new stretches of DNA, more specifically a “TTAGGG” sequence, onto the ends ofContinue reading The “Immortality Enzyme”: Human Telomerase Holoenzyme as a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target

Advancements in cancer immunotherapies: CAR-T cell technology

By Yuki Agarwala We encounter over 60,000 germs every day, yet we do not find ourselves falling sick every day due to the efficiency of our immune system.1 We have an innate and adaptive immune system – the innate response is a general reaction that occurs early during infections, whereas the adaptive response is antigen-specificContinue reading “Advancements in cancer immunotherapies: CAR-T cell technology”

The role of the gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease

By Michelle Lam Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia, affecting over 50 million people worldwide.1 With improvements in global health, dementia cases are projected to triple by 2050.2 Despite advancements in understanding disease progression, there are still no disease-modifying therapies available. Therefore, it is crucial that new biomarkers are identified to overcomeContinue reading The role of the gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease

Differences between paediatric and adult cancers: more than an age gap

By Anastasia Alenova Childhood cancers are less common than adult cancers. Although it might sound as reassuring news, this difference can lead to worse management of disease in children. While causes for adult cancers are better defined, especially the impact of lifestyle choices such as smoking, causes for paediatric cancers are less well-defined. A hypothesisContinue reading “Differences between paediatric and adult cancers: more than an age gap”